Thursday, April 23, 2015

Sponge Bread with Olive Oil (1720)

  • 5 cups sifted unbleached flour
  • 1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour
  • 1/2 cup raw sugar or light brown sugar
  • 2 tbspns olive oil
  • 1 1/2 tspns salt
  • 2 cups warm water
  • 2 packages active dry yeast, softened in 1/2 cup warm water
Combine softened yeast, raw sugar, warm water, and 2 cups of the unbleached flour in a large bowl, and beat until smooth.  Cover with a cloth, set in a warm spot, and let rise about 30 minutes until very light and spongy.

Stir in salt and olive oil, then mix in whole wheat flour and 2 1/2 cups unbleached flour.  Again cover with cloth, set in a warm spot, and let rise until doubled in bulk, about 45 minutes.  

Turn out on a very well-floured board (dough will be soft and sticky), and knead in about 1/2 to 3/4 cup unbleached flour until dough is elastic and no longer sticky.  Knead vigorously about 10 minutes, flouring the board and your hands as necessary.

Divide dough in half, knead each half about 25 to 30 times, then shape into round loaves about 5 inches across.  Place in greased layer cake pans, cover with cloth, and let rise in a warm spot until doubled in bulk, about 45 minutes.  

Bake in hot over (400 degrees) about 30 minutes until richly browned and loaves give hollow sound when thumped with your finders.  Remove from pans and let cool on wire racks at least 10 minutes, then cut into wedges and serve.  Make 2 loaves.

(Origin - "Recipes from America's Restored Villages" by Jean Anderson, 1975. This recipe was taken from Historic St. Augustine in St. Augustine, Florida, in existence from 1565 to 1821, when Florida joined the United States.)

Also from "America's Restored Villages"

Parsnips Stewed in Dark Beer (1627)


Fried Pork Balls (1935)

"Chop an equal part of cold boiled potatoes and salt pork.  Cold boiled ham may be used in place of salt pork.

"Mix and season with pepper and wet with eggs.   Roll with flour and fry until brown."

(Origin - My grandmother's collection of recipes from neighbors and friends. All recipes are handwritten, typed or newspaper clippings, from the 1930s to 1950s.  My grandmother was a farmer's wife in California's Central Valley. This recipe was by Viola Patterson of Los Angeles.) 

More Recipes from My Grandmother's Collection

Honey Sweet Potatoes with Corn Flakes (1946)

  • 6 medium sweet potatoes
  • 1/2 cup honey
  • 1 cup Corn Flake crumbs
  • 2 tbspns butter
  • 1 tspn salt
Scrub sweet potatoes thoroughly and cook in boiling water until tender.  Peel and cut in slices 12-inch thick.

Dips sweet potato slices in honey and roll in salted Corn Flake crumbs.  Place in greased baking dish and dot with butter.

Bake in hot oven, 425 degrees, about 25 minutes.  Serves six.

(Origin - "Secrets from Pocono Kitchens" by the Women's Auxiliary of Stroudsburg Presbyterian Church of Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania, 1946. Recipe was by Ruth S. Bush.)

More "Secrets from Pocono Kitchens"

Banana Fritters with Lemon (1946)

Hot Dandelion Dressing with Bacon (1946)


Monday, April 13, 2015

New Orleans Flaming Rum Omelette (1975)

  • 4 large eggs
  • 2 tbspns milk
  • 3 tbspns plus 2 tspns sugar
  • 1/2 cup rum
  • 3 tbspns butter
  • 1/4 tspn salt
  • 1/4 tspn white pepper
In a mixing bowl, combine the eggs, milk, salt, pepper, and 3 tablespoons sugar, and beat with a wire whisk until thoroughly mixed and airy.  

In a 10-inch omelette pan, melt the butter until it begins to sizzle, then pour in the egg mixture. Cook over high heat for 1 minute, then lower the heat to medium.  Keep tilting the omelette pan from side to side with a circular motion to keep the omelette from sticking.  

Cook until the top is no longer wet, then sprinkle with 2 teaspoons sugar.  Pass the pan under a preheated broiler for about 30 seconds to caramelize the sugar.

Heat the rum in a small pan until it bubbles. Pour it over the omelette and ignite, then spoon the burning rum over the omelette until the flame dies out.  Divide in half and serve immediately, with the liquid from the pan poured over.  Serves 2.  

"This fluffy pancake-style flamed dessert is an old Creole favorite."

(Origin - "The New Orleans Cookbook: by Rima and Richard Collin, 1975.  Note - Rima Collin was founder of The New Orleans Cooking School. Richard Collin was famed as the New Orleans "Underground Gourmet.")

Macaroni and Cheese with Wine (1963)

  • 2 cups uncooked macaroni
  • 2 tbspns softened butter
  • 1 1/2 cups sharp Cheddar cheese, cubed
  • 1 1/2 cups rich milk or thin cream
  • 1/2 cup California Sauterne or other white dinner wine
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 2 to 3 tbspns chopped green chiles
  • 1/2 tspn dry mustard
  • 1/2 tspn salt
  • 1/2 cup bread crumbs mixed with 2 tbspns melted butter
Combine all ingredients except bread crumbs. Mix well.

Place in buttered 1 1/2-quart baking dish. Sprinkle with butter crumbs.  Bake, covered, in a moderate oven (350 degrees) for 40 to 50 minutes.

Let stand 5 to 10 minutes before serving, to thicken liquid in casserole. Serves 6. 

(Origin - "Favorite Recipes of California Winemakers" collected and published by the Wine Advisory Board of San Francisco, 1963. This recipe was from Mrs. Ted Yamada of American Society of Enologists in Anaheim, California.)

You also might enjoy:

Macaroni Cheese Souffle De Luxe (1936)


Sherry Chicken (1965)

  • 2 frying chickens, cut in serving pieces
  • 1 cup California Dry Sherry
  • 1 medium green pepper, chopped
  • 1 cup parsley, chopped
  • 5 green onions, chopped
  • 1 large onion. chopped
  • Olive oil
  • 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1/3 cup sifted flour
  • 1 1/2 tspns salt
  • 1/4 tspn pepper
  • 1/4 tspn oregano
In a strong paper bag,  mix cheese, flour, salt, pepper and oregano.  Add chicken pieces, and shake well.  Fry chicken in olive oil until golden brown.

Place a layer of chicken in roasting pan.  Mix green pepper, parsley, and onions, and spread part of mixture over chicken in pan.  Add more chicken; cover with more of vegetable mixture.    Continue until all chicken and vegetables are used. 

Pour sherry over all. Cover and bake in slow oven (300 degrees) for 1 hour or until tender. 

(Origin - "Adventures in Wine Cookery" collected and published by the Wine Advisory Board of San Francisco, 1965. Recipe was from Joseph Ghianda of Ghianda's Winery in Oroville, California.) 

More Sherry Recipes

Shrimp Richert in Sherry (1965)

Pistachio Rice Pilaf in Sherry (1954)

Halibut Portuguesa in Sherry (1965)


Farmer's Apricot Pecan Candy (1970)

  • 1 lb confectioners sugar
  • 6 tbspns melted butter
  • 2 tbspns orange juice
  • 1/2 tspn vanilla
  • 1 cup chopped pecans or walnuts
  • 1 11-oz package of dried apricots, ground (about 1 1/2 cup)
Combine sugar, butter, orange juice and vanilla.  Add apricots.  Mix, then knead in a bowl until ingredients are well mixed.

Form into 1-inch balls. Roll in chopped pecans or walnuts. Store in refrigerator or freezer in covered container.  Flavor improves with storage.  Makes six dozen candies.

If you like, you can omit the chopped nuts, and roll the candy balls in 1 1/2 cups shredded coconut.

(Origin - "Homemade Candy" by the food editors of Farm Journal, 1970.)

More from "Homemade Candy"

Sunday, March 29, 2015

Parsnips Stewed in Dark Beer (1627)

  • 1 lb parsnips, peeled and cut in 2-inch chunks (halve the thick chunks from the top of the parsnips lengthwise so that they willk cook tender in about the same time as the thinner root ends)
  • 1 cup dark beer or stout
  • A 1-inch piece of stick cinnamon
  • 2 large blades of mace
  • 3 whole cloves
  • Pinch of salt
  • Pinch of pepper
Place all ingredients in a heavy, medium-size saucepan and simmer, covered, 30 to 35 minutes until you can pierce parsnips easily with a fork. Turn heat to low and simmer, uncovered, 10 to 15 minutes longer until the beer or stout has thickened into a glaze.  

Remove cinnamon, mace, and cloves, and serve parsnips hot as an accompaniment to roast fowl, ham, or pork.

(Origin - "Recipes from America's Restored Villages" by Jean Anderson, 1975. This recipe was taken from the Plimouth Plantation in Plymouth, Massachusetts, in existence from 1627 to 1691.)

Southern Buttermilk Jam Cake (1965)

  • 3 1/2 cups flour
  • 6 eggs, separated
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 1 cup jam
  • 1 cup citron
  • 1 cup butter
  • 1 cup buttermilk
  • 1 tspn vanilla
  • 1 tspn soda, rounded
  • 1 tspn ground allspice
  • 1 tspn ground cloves
  • 1 tspn cinnamon
  • 1 tspn nutmeg
Separate eggs.  Cream butter and sugar, and add egg yolks. Beat good.  Sift dry ingredients. Add each, alternating with buttermilk. Add other ingredients, with vanilla and egg whites added last. 

Bake in 4 pans at 350 degrees for 30 to 35 minutes.

(Origin - "Heirloom Recipes of Yesterday and Today for Tomorrow" by Oxford-Lafayette Historic Homes, Inc. of Oxford, Mississippi, 1965.)  

Banana Fritters with Lemon (1946)

  • 3 bananas
  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 egg
  • 1/4 cup milk
  • 1 tbspn lemon juice
  • 1 tbspn sugar
  • 2 tspns baking powder
  • 1/4 tspn salt
  • Powdered sugar
Sift and mix all dry ingredients (except powdered sugar).  Add, in order, 1 egg, 1/4 cup milk, 1 tablespoon lemon juice.  Then mash bananas, and add to mixture.  

Drop by spoonfuls into hot fat.  Drain and sprinkle with powdered sugar.

(Origin - "Secrets from Pocono Kitchens" by the Women's Auxiliary of Stroudsburg Presbyterian Church of Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania, 1946. Recipe was by Mrs. Anna C. Lloyd.).) 

Thursday, March 19, 2015

Barbecued Rabbit (1935)

  • 1 rabbit, cut for frying
  • 3/4 cup onion, chopped fine
  • 1/2 cup celery, diced
  • 3/4 melted shortening
  • 2 tbspns vinegar
  • 2 tbspns lemon juice
  • 1/2 cup catsup
  • 1 1/2 tbspn Worcestershire sauce
  • 1/2 tbspn prepared mustard
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 tspn salt
  • 1/8 tspn red pepper

Cut rabbit for frying, and place in shallow baking dish.  Brown onions and celery in melted fat. Add remaining ingredients and simmer 15 minutes in covered pan.

Pour 1/4 of mixture over rabbit. Bake 1 1/2 hours, basting every 25 minutes with remaining mixture.

(Origin - My grandmother's collection of recipes from neighbors and friends. All recipes are handwritten, typed or newspaper clippings, from the 1930s to 1950s.  My grandmother was a farmer's wife in California's Central Valley.) 

Also from Grandma's Cookbook

Gingered Rabbit Casserole (1938)


Oatmeal Coconut Cookies with Dates, Figs (1935)

  • 2 eggs
  • 2 cups brown sugar
  • 1 cup melted butter
  • 1 cup cocoanut
  • 1 cup chopped nuts, not fine
  • 1 cup cut-up dates or figs
  • 2 cups flour
  • 4 cups rolled oats, uncooked
  • 1 1/2 tspns baking powder
  • 1/2 tspn soda with 4 tbspns hot water
Beat eggs, and add each ingredient in order given.  Mix each item thoroughly as added.

Will be very stiff and dry.  Drop by spoonful in cookie tins, and shape. Bake in moderate oven.

(Origin - My grandmother's collection of recipes from neighbors and friends. All recipes are handwritten, typed or newspaper clippings, from the 1930s to 1950s.  My grandmother was a farmer's wife in California's Central Valley.) 

Monday, March 16, 2015

Avocado Crab Mornay with Sherry (1980)

  • 1 1/2 lbs crab meat
  • 3 avocados, peeled, pitted, diced
  • 6 scallions, minced
  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 1/4 cup flour
  • 1 cup light cream 
  • 1/2 cup sherry wine
  • 1/2 cup chicken broth
  • 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • 2 tbspns shredded Gruyere or Swiss cheese
  • Dash of cayenne pepper
  • Dash of salt
  • Dash of nutmeg
  • Freshly grated Parmesan cheese
In a saucepan, melt 1/4 cup butter and stir in flour with a whisk. Add the cream and chicken broth, and stir until smooth.  Blend in sherry wine, 1/4 cup Parmesan cheese, Swiss or Gruyere cheese, nutmeg, cayenne pepper, and salt.  Remove from heat.  

In a large skillet, gently saute the scallions in 1/4 cup butter until barely limp.  Add avocados and crab meat, and stir to heat through.  Add the sauce and heat, gently stirring. Don't boil.

Mound the crab meat mixture in individual ramekins or scallop shells.  Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese.  Bake 5 minutes at 500 degrees.  Serve immediately with green salad and rolls.  Serves 8 to 10.

(Origin - A Private Collection of Truly Special Recipes" by the Junior League of Palo Alto, California, 1980.)

Queen Elizabeth Cake (1961)

  • 1 1/2 cups sifted plain flour
  • 1 cup boiling water
  • 1 cup dates
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup nut meats
  • 1/4 cup butter
  • 1 tspn vanilla
  • 1 tspn soda
  • 1 tspn baking powder
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 1/2 tspn salt
  • Brown sugar frosting (recipe below)
Put soda in boiling water and pour over dates.  Let stand while mixing batter.  Cream sugar and butter.  Add egg, then vanilla.

Sift dry ingredients together and gradually add to batter.  dd nuts, then date mixture.  Mix well.  Bake in 9 X 12 greased pan at 350 degrees.  

Frosting

  • 5 tbspns brown sugar
  • 5 tbspns light cream
  • 2 tbspns butter
  • Grated coconut or chopped nuts
Combine and boil for three minutes.  Spread on cake without beating.  Sprinkle with grated coconut or chopped nuts.

"This is said to be the cake that Queen Elizabeth makes herself in the palace kitchen.  The recipe is sold for 50 cents, and the money is used for charity."

(Origin - "The Gasparilla Cookbook" by the Junior League of Tampa, 1961.)

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Hot Dandelion Dressing with Bacon (1946)

"Cut one-half pound bacon in dice and fry in skillet until crisp.Add:

  • three cupfuls water, 
  • one-half cupful of vinegar, 
  • one-half cupful sugar, 
  • one-half teaspoonful salt...
... and bring to simmer.  Mix three tablespoonfuls flour with one egg, and cream to form a thin paste. Add slowly to first mixture, stirring all the while.

"Cool slightly and pour over about two pounds of cleaned dandelions. Serve with boiled potatoes."

(Origin - "Secrets from Pocono Kitchens" by the Women's Auxiliary of Stroudsburg Presbyterian Church of Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania, 1946. Recipe was by Mrs. John Henning.)